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Ten Recording Tips for DIY Bands Florissant MO

Patching and re-patching is a pain, so get an interface (or mixer) with enough inputs that you can leave everything patched in and ready to go. Just remember to mute any inputs that aren't in use.

Little Shoppe Of Guitars
(314) 831-8784
515 Paul Ave
Florissant, MO
 
Eddies Guitars
(314) 781-7500
7362 Manchester Rd
Maplewood, MO
 
Guitar Center Bridgeton
(314) 738-0500
11977 St. Charles Rock Rd.
Bridgeton, MO
Store Information
Mon-Thur: 11-9
Fri: 10-9
Sat: 10-8
Sun: 11-6

L S Electronics
(314) 426-9355
9516 Lackland Rd (Rear)
Overland, MO
 
Piano Gallery, Inc.
(314) 344-1133
12033 Dorsett Rd
Maryland Heights, MO
 
Goez Stringed Instr.
(314) 647-1211
3103 Sutton Blvd.
Maplewood, MO
 
Guitar Center #342
(314) 738-0500
11977 Saint Charles Rock Rd
Bridgeton, MO
 
Guitar Center #342
11977 St Charles Rock Rd
Bridgeton, MO
 
L.S. Electronics
(314) 426-9355
9516 Lackland Rd Rear
Overland, MO
 
Halpin Music Co.
(618) 462-0666
2375 Homer M Adams Pkwy
Alton, IL
 

Ten Recording Tips for DIY Bands

Don’t spend time perfecting a mix or editing while you’re recording.
One corollary to the above is when you’re tracking, you’re tracking. Spending time mixing, or doing anything other than the most basic edits, will likely make any live vibe disappear from the tracking process.

Make technology serve you — not the reverse.
Use tools like Beat Detective to create a tempo map from a human drummer, rather than line up the drummer to the grid. Use pitch correction to revive a funky old instrument with bad intonation, rather than make every note of a vocal track perfect. And if you do use pitch correction, don’t use it in “automatic” mode — tune the offending notes manually, and if there are too many of those, try another take. Use technology to capitalize on your strengths, rather than cover your weaknesses.

Retire your patch bay.
Patching and re-patching is a pain, so get an interface (or mixer) with enough inputs that you can leave everything patched in and ready to go. Just remember to mute any inputs that aren’t in use.

Use effects and samples “in addition to,” not “instead of.”
Because you have virtually unlimited tracks in a DAW, you can use effects and samples on a copy of the original track, and then blend it with the original, rather than replace the original track altogether. If you have an anemic snare drum, rather than replace it with a sample, replace a copy of it with a sample and blend that with the original. If you want a heavily compressed vocal, compress a copy of the vocal track and blend in the original track to retain some dynamics.

Object-oriented editing: the scalpel, not the machete.
Along the same lines as the above tip, it’s so easy to process a track with an effect — maybe too easy, because sometimes you really just need to process a small part, but you leave the effect on because it’s too much hassle to automate it in and out (if indeed it can be automated). With object-oriented editing, as found on Samplitude, Sonar, and some other programs, you can isolate just the section that needs to be edited and apply the effect. This saves on CPU, too, as the effect uses CPU only when needed.

Make eye contact.
Bands thrive on interaction; try not to record in an environment where you’re isolated from each other. Put amps in amp booths if necessary, stand in the same room with the drummer, and make sure you can all see each other while tracking. It’ll save a lot of frustration and/or editing time later.

Let it bleed.
I’ve mentioned this before, but a little bleed can be a good thing. If you don’t believe me, then why do some drum software instruments include “bleed” controls when they could just as easily have no bleed at all? Having the whole room sound in at least a few tracks tends to “glue” the whole mix together better. And if you’re a solo musician, consider putting a mic in the room when the monitor speakers are cranked up, and recording a little bit of that on its own track. Sometimes it’s the “secret in...

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