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Recording Tips Sandy UT

Recording vocals can be a challenge— even if you’re experienced. For the singer, preparation, technique, and energy are critical. On the production side, understanding how singers work—as well as what you can do to help them deliver brilliant performances— are essential skills. But whichever side of the glass you’re on, these 12 tips should guide you to fruitful, dynamic, and inspired sessions.

University of Utah
1375 E Presidents Cir/RM 204
Salt Lake City, UT
 
University of Utah (School of Music - University of Utah)
(801) 581-6762
1375 E Presidents Circle Rm 204
Salt Lake City, UT
 
Wasatch Music Coaching Academy
(801) 485-4857
952 E. 900 South
Salt Lake City, UT
Hours
Mon-Fri 7:00am- 5:30pm

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University of Utah
1375 E Presidents Cir/RM 204
Salt Lake City, UT
 
Weber State University
3850 University Cir.
Ogden, UT
 
University of Utah
(801) 581-7366
Salt Lake City UT
Salt Lake City, UT

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Singers Unlimited
(801) 944-2322
8699 Highland Dr
Sandy, UT

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Utah Conservatory
(435) 649-6292
1612 Ute Blv, Ste 206
Park City, UT

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Brigham Young University
C-550 Harris Fine Arts Center
Provo, UT
 
Brigham Young University
(801) 422-3083
Provo UT
Provo, UT

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Recording Tips

Recording vocals can be a challenge— even if you’re experienced. For the singer, preparation, technique, and energy are critical. On the production side, understanding how singers work—as well as what you can do to help them deliver brilliant performances— are essential skills. But whichever side of the glass you’re on, these 12 tips should guide you to fruitful, dynamic, and inspired sessions.

See the Coach

Working with a vocal coach prior to recording is always a good idea. Go through the material you’re going to record, and listen to the coach’s feedback on pitch, phrasing, stamina, breathing, and so on. The goal is to remedy any potential vocal problems before you stand in front of those sexy studio mics.

Do Preproduction

Work out the song so that the lyrics, timing, phrasing, and breathingare rock solid before you start recording. This sounds so obvious, but many singers and producers blow this step, and the result is often a performance that’s less than what it could (or should) be.

Choose the Right Key

A half-step up or down can make a huge difference in whether a singer can deliver a great performance. Try the song in at least three keys: the key you think it will work in, a half step higher, and a half step lower.

Warm Up

Most singers typically need 45 minutes to an hour to warm up their voices enough to cut a good vocal. Matt Forger— who engineered Michael Jackson’s Thriller, Bad, and Dangerous albums—advises, “Do vocal exercises so that your voice will sound up to par right from the beginning of the session.” I like to sing scales in an octave sequence up to my high end, and then sing the chorus of the song I’m about to record to see if my voice feels completely comfortable and free. Remember, unlike guitarists or keyboard players, the singer’s body is their instrument, so make sure the vocalist is in his or her “peak-performance zone.”

Do a “Flight Check”

Before you press the Record button at the session, make sure the singer is prepared mentally, physically, technically, and emotionally to give a great performance. “Recording is a psychological, as well as a technical process,” notes Buddy Halligan, chief audio engineer for USC’s School of Cinematic Arts. “The producer/engineer needs to understand that they need to make the singer feel comfortable and confident, so that they can deliver the best vocal possible.”

Freshness Counts

Don’t make the vocalist wait for other instruments to be tracked before you start on the vocals. The singer may get tired or distracted, and lose the energy required to cut a great vocal track. Always schedule a separate date that focuses solely on the vocal tracks.

Watch Your Mouth

Take caution and only drink water or tea. Recently, I had a bite of chocolate before I sang a track (I couldn’t resist), and the engineer “heard” the change in my vocal tone. Ouch! Happily, the antidote was taking a bite of a green apple.

Mic Selection

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