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Miking for Grand Pianos Coeur D Alene ID

Grand pianos may seem like formidable beasts to record, but they’re actually as tame as any other instrument. Depending on the sound you’re going after—in your face, bright, ambient, warm, and so on—success is typically measured by critical listening, mic selection, mic placement, and the artistry and dynamic sensitivity of the performer.

North Idaho College (North Idaho College - Music Program)
(208) 769-3300
1000 W. Garden Avenue
Coeur d'Alene, ID
 
Idaho State University
(208) 282-2475
Pocatello ID
Pocatello, ID

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Mountains & Strings Chamber Music Retreat
(208) 317-2224
Rexburg ID
Rexburg, ID

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University of Idaho
Rm 206 Music Building
Moscow, ID
 
Brigham Young University - Idaho
(208) 496-1036
Rexburg ID
Rexburg, ID

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Conrad Vi
(208) 777-9533
2120 Northwest Blvd Ste C
Coeur D Alene, ID

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College of Southern Idaho
208-733-9554 x2557
Twin Falls ID
Twin Falls, ID

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Albertson College of Idaho
2112 Cleveland Blvd.
Caldwell, ID
 
Albertson College of Idaho
(208) 459-5275
Caldwell ID
Caldwell, ID

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Brenda's Piano Studio
(208) 356-6334
172 K Street
Rexburg, ID
 
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Miking for Grand Pianos

Grand pianos may seem like formidable beasts to record, but they’re actually as tame as any other instrument. Depending on the sound you’re going after—in your face, bright, ambient, warm, and so on—success is typically measured by critical listening, mic selection, mic placement, and the artistry and dynamic sensitivity of the performer. Here are some starting points for devising your own approach to miking a grand.

Open the Hood

A pretty basic option is opening the lid of the piano and positioning a mic near the treble strings, and a mic near the bass strings. If you want more of a percussive midrange attack, choose a dynamic mic such as the Shure SM57 for each position, and place the mics about a foot from the piano strings. Move the mics until you get the preferred balance of lows, mids, and highs. If I want a little more complexity in the midrange—as well as sweeter highs—I trade out the dynamics for large-diaphragm condensers. For a slightly odd sound, use a single condenser set to its figure-8 pattern, and position it right in the middle of the soundboard and about a foot high. Face the mic directly at the strings so that one side gets the attack of the piano, and the other side picks up reflections off the piano lid, as well as some reflections from the recording environment itself. You can also position the mic sideways, allowing the piano’s bass, mid, and treble frequencies to become washed in a little more room ambience.

Go Long

If you want less of a percussive attack, you can move the mics completely away from the piano soundboard. In this application—as the mics are not positioned inside the piano—you can experiment with opening or closing the top of the piano. Walk around the room and try to determine where you hear the sound you want—which, for me, is typically a magnificent blend of the source piano sound and room ambience. If I’m incorporating the piano into a rather dense rock-type mix, I typically opt for a single condenser mic, as a mono track can often be positioned within the mix a bit easier (via panning, EQ, and level) to deliver enough impact against the competing sonic textures. I’ll also experiment with polar patterns. If I want an “audience perspective,” I may go with a cardioid pattern that picks up more sound from the front of the mic. If I want to capture a more ambient, “piano room” sound, I’ll go with an omni pattern. There’s no wrong way to do this—just go with whatever option gets you all tingly.

For a stereo piano track, position two condenser mics at the spot where you heard the best sound. You can point the mics away from each other in a “Y” pattern, or towards each other in an “X” pattern. Again, there’s no right or wrong, so play around until you get what you’re looking for. Sonic tweakers can also experiment with putting up two matched large-diaphragm condensers, or using two different condensers, or mixing a largediaphragm condenser and a smalldiaphragm condenser, or going with two small-diaph...

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