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Focusing on the Purpose of Your Track Harrison AR

Do you ever ask yourself exactly what your track is trying to achieve? Is it sad, happy, full of bravado, aggressive, sensual, bombastic, or light? It's good to know, because focusing on the end result can help lead you to decisions about appropriate tones, signal processing, and the placement of elements in the final mix.

Laws Electronics
(479) 452-1413
6802 Rogers Avenue #3 Laws Electronics
Fort Smith, AR
 
Magnolia Home Theater
(479) 619-2301
2220 PROMENADE BLVD
Rogers, AR
 
Automated Lifestyles Inc.
(479) 464-4434
6 Central Heights Way
Bentonville, AR
 
Custom Home & Commercial Electronics
(479) 750-7111
P. O. Box 1383
Fayetteville, AR
Services
Audio / Video, Home Automation / Systems Integration / Home Networking, Home Theater, Lighting Control, Security / Access Control / Surveillance / Gate Access
Brands
Sony A/V designers; Touch screens; Lutron lighting; Stewart screens; UStec structured wiring systems; Doorking, FAAC & sentex gate systems; Ademco security & all other major brands.
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One or more employees at this company have achieved CEDIA Professional Certification status:- James (Butch) Coger, CEDIA Certified Professional EST II

Audio Dimensions
(405) 843-3355
1111 S. Bowman Rd., Suite B2
Little Rock, AR
 
Sound Concepts
(870) 268-8178
2924 Longview Suite A
Jonesboro, AR
 
DeBoard Electronics
(501) 329-6308
415 Oak
Conway, AR
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Home Automation / Systems Integration / Home Networking, Home Theater, Lighting Control, Multi-Room Audio, Multi-Room Controls, Multi-Room Video, Satellite, Security / Access Control / Surveillance / Gate Access, Wire and Cable / Power Management, iPhone / iPad integration
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Sony, Sony ES, Denon, Polk Audio, Russound, Monster Cable, Sunfire, Sonance, Elan, LG, Centralite, Sanus, Draper, and Lutron.
Certifications
One or more employees at this company have achieved CEDIA Professional Certification status:- Steve Tapley, CEDIA Certified Professional EST II

Audio Dimensions
(501) 223-1115
Suite # B2 1111 S. Bowman Rd.
Little Rock, AR
 
Custom Audio Video
(501) 227-9077
10014 Rodney Parham Road
Little Rock, AR
 
IntelliLiving, Inc.
(479) 464-4434
215 SE 28th Street, Suite 5
Bentonville, AR
 

Focusing on the Purpose of Your Track

“For me, interesting music has a lot of counterpoint,” he said, “so I’ve always been very adamant that the other musicians don’t play what I’m playing. Particularly in a trio setting, having three different parts interlocking makes for a much bigger, and more interesting sound.”
Bingo! Duh! News flash!
Summers wasn’t necessarily discussing recording, but his comment definitely offers the promise of a solution for anyone disappointed in the, ahem, less-than-mammoth stature of their recorded works in general, and their guitar tracks in particular. Too often, we shrink the impact of our mixes by piling on overdubs, effects, and textures. The temptation of the “more is better” approach can be great, but if “more” means more things doing relatively the same things, or more elements enhancing similar frequency ranges, then all the layers you’re adding may just be creating something more worse.
In these instances, the guiding premise of Mr. Summers’ strategy is brilliantly simple: Do not record anything that apes, mimics, clones, or mirrors a part that already exists in your mix. By devising different, rather than similar and supportive elements, you just might churn out guitar tracks that sound as big as all Montana.
Obviously, this theorem doesn’t work for all styles — ’70s-style punk comes to mind — but, purely as an experiment that might lead you to new discoveries about arrangement, engineering, and production, let’s approach Andy’s mandate in three easy steps.

STEP ONE: SET THE STAGE


Do you ever ask yourself exactly what your track is trying to achieve? Is it sad, happy, full of bravado, aggressive, sensual, bombastic, or light? It’s good to know, because focusing on the end result can help lead you to decisions about appropriate tones, signal processing, and the placement of elements in the final mix. When I do recording seminars, I often find that musicians tend to develop a gaggle of cool tracks, and then try to fit everything together.
This is not a Summers-approved tactic. Summers and his Police mates work extremely hard to craft parts that enhance the meaning of the song. In this experiment, start by limiting yourself to the minimum number of parts required to effectively deliver your message. I recommend tipping your hat to the Police by using drums, bass, a couple of guitar parts, a lead vocal, and a few background vocals.

STEP TWO: FIND YOUR PLACE


Drums, bass, and guitar fill up a ton of sonic space, and the punch factor is going to be more intense if those instruments aren’t fighting each other for breathing room. Think about making space, rather than filling it. First, employ the Summers Mandate by ensuring your drum and bass parts — and tones — aren’t colliding with each other. Have the bass play off the drums, and don’t EQ the kick drum and bass to sit in the same frequency range.
Work with the guitar the same way. Look for a rhythm part that drops into the holes, and watch your tone. Don’t dial in low mids that obscure th...

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